What do you know you need to work on? Any tips?
#1

I know that I need to work on being able to remember and identify the back row.  I am getting more comfortable with the back row attack rules, but I struggle with identifying the correct players as they rotate around.

There is also that darn hand signal numbering system ... ugh.

This one may be odd ... but administering yellow/red cards.  Not something I have done or practiced.  (Since I mentioned that in another thread just now.)

Any tips?
Reply
#2

For rotation, it is helpful to be able to identify the setter(s) and where they are in the rotation. You should also be able to identify any players who are standout players. Notice the proximity of the two to each other.

If a team uses a libero, you only need to identify the other two back row players to be sure of who is front row. It is something that you have to do every rotation in order to become more comfortable with the process over the course of many seasons. It will likely not happen this eason or even next, but it will if you really work at it.

As far as cards go, do not resist their use if they are needed. If it's for a player, a yellow card is akin to "That's enough" on the baseball field. It carries no penalty, but corrects unsportsmanlike behavior. If a coach earns one, give it. Simply hold the card up on the side that is being penalized. The administering is signaled like an "out" call except that you use only one hand. If its a red card, both hands on one side of your body with the red card in one hand and the yellow in the other. If 15 years I have used my red card twice.
Reply
#3

Thanks for the tips!  It’s good to hear that it can take seasons to get the back row memorization down.  Well, it’s good to hear that’s normal anyway.

The libero makes it easier.  I’ve tried the “identify two opposites” and usually make it until one of them subs out.  I’m probably making it much more difficult in my head.  Then again, I have to write a note to remind me to grab the list so I remember why I went to the store.   Tongue
Reply
#4

Almost through my first season. I was advised at the beginning of the season to not worry too much about back-row violations unless I'm absolutely sure it was one. I've started trying to pick up ways to remember back row players, but know that it's something that will take some time to master.

Hand numbers seems so stupid. American Sign Language can do any number up to 1,000 with one hand, and we're over here using four hands to signal 97. I think just using 1-9 (and a fist for 0) in sign language on each hand, knowing the right is first digit and left is second digit, would work. But, when in Rome.

My biggest goal is to "open" my view, especially during net play. It's hard for me to see everything going on and judge it, especially when R1. I had my first R2 match last week, and it was so much easier to see the net play from that angle, primarily because I didn't have to focus on the ball as quickly.
Reply
#5

(09-29-2019, 03:08 AM)Kevin_K Wrote:  If its a red card, both hands on one side of your body with the red card in one hand and the yellow in the other.

That's not correct.  A red card is displayed the same as a yellow card (just like a RUD is the same as a YUD).  The two-handed mechanic you mention is for expulsion (or whatever FED calls it).
Reply
#6

(09-30-2019, 04:26 PM)noumpere Wrote:  
(09-29-2019, 03:08 AM)Kevin_K Wrote:  If its a red card, both hands on one side of your body with the red card in one hand and the yellow in the other.

That's not correct.  A red card is displayed the same as a yellow card (just like a RUD is the same as a YUD).  The two-handed mechanic you mention is for expulsion (or whatever FED calls it).

Like I said, 15 years and two red cards. If I signal it improperly color me stupid. Guilty as charged!
Reply
#7

(09-27-2019, 09:09 PM)The Man in Blue Wrote:  I know that I need to work on being able to remember and identify the back row.  I am getting more comfortable with the back row attack rules, but I struggle with identifying the correct players as they rotate around.

There is also that darn hand signal numbering system ... ugh.

This one may be odd ... but administering yellow/red cards.  Not something I have done or practiced.  (Since I mentioned that in another thread just now.)

Any tips?
I'd love to hear what other refs "internal dialogs" are like for identifying rotations and back row players and just keeping with the flow of the set. I can picture in my mind what a training video of that would look like. I've looked around youtube and at NFHSlearn.com but not found what I'm looking for.
[show card on right half of screen]
(inner dialog: last server was 14, so front row is 6, 22, 9 (pause) 10 (which better be behind 9), 1 9 (which better be in front of 22))
[show receiving players on court on left half of screen, highlight players while inner dialog audio plays]
Repeat in subsequent rotations, pointing out what you should really remember while stepping through rotations (like setter number, last server), show timing and through process when handling substitutions, time outs, next server requests, complaints.

Agreed on the hand numbering system. Can't imagine why they did not go with the existing standard sign language, but then again volleyball seems to love inconsistencies!

I made a "cheat sheet" for yellow cards because I found I was flipping all through the book to narrow down what should happen in various situations, compounded by changes Florida made to the national rules (again, volleyball loves inconsistencies!). In making it, and reviewing it periodically, I find I'm getting a much better handle on it.
Reply
#8

I'd love to hear what other refs "internal dialogs" are like for identifying rotations and back row players and just keeping with the flow of the set

Mine sounds like this:

(looking left ) ....12 serving ...libero... 4 is setter....back row..... (looking right) libero....... 5 just served......3 is setter.... hiding behind 6..... watch for back row set both sides

OK..... here we go left arm out and whistle

Point to the right

6 just rotated to front row..... 9 coming in to serve ... she's a setter... 6/2 offense.... 6 is hitting 9 is hands.... (look left) 12 just served..... 4 still back row with libero
Reply
#9

My pea-brain is hurting just reading this ...
Reply
#10

(10-13-2019, 10:05 PM)The Man in Blue Wrote:  My pea-brain is hurting just reading this ...

Same here. I know it's something that comes naturally, but having to remember two sets of numbers, moving them around at different times, and processing it during live play just makes my head spin.
Reply
#11

First, it's impossible, at first, to get and remember all six players on each side. Start just with the setter. Then add the opposite. Then add the libero (and is the libero leading or trailing the setter). That will get you 98% of the alignment errors, and 99.5% of those that matter.

I keep track on my fingers of which rotation the team is in. That helps me identify the pattern the team should be using. And, I say the back row players to myself before each serve (excluding the libero) -- so it's usually just two numbers per side. I repeat them to myself as the ball crosses the net so I know specifically who to look for.

Finally (or maybe this should be first), watch this video (scroll to the bottom of the page): http://wnevo.org/?page_id=163
Reply
#12

(10-14-2019, 02:59 PM)noumpere Wrote:  And, I say the back row players to myself before each serve (excluding the libero) -- so it's usually just two numbers per side.  I repeat them to myself as the ball crosses the net so I know specifically who to look for.

I tried this last night and found it very helpful! Remembering 4-6 numbers on each serve was easy and became repetitive after a bit (I can still tell you that the one side had 1-2-3 and the other side had 10-2-12 as one of the rotations).
Reply
#13

OK, now it is just cheating if they are sequential (i.e., 1, 2, 3) ...



Here is one other thing I have noticed I need to work on (it hasn’t been pointed out to me, but I have realized it) ... watching tips at the net. I typically watch the players as they move to the ball, not the ball going up and down (“don’t be a bobble head”) on the first few hits. My last few games I noticed this has led me to “leading” the play with my eyes and I am not focusing on the ball crossing the net. Instead I am leading across and “preparing” for the other side’s play. Bad habit in the making ...
Reply
#14

Here is one other thing I have noticed I need to work on (it hasn’t been pointed out to me, but I have realized it) ... watching tips at the net. I typically watch the players as they move to the ball, not the ball going up and down (“don’t be a bobble head”) on the first few hits. My last few games I noticed this has led me to “leading” the play with my eyes and I am not focusing on the ball crossing the net. Instead I am leading across and “preparing” for the other side’s play. Bad habit in the making ...
[/quote]


There are no definites when it comes to officiating. Looking at where the ball is going helps in a lot of situations, but not all. Sometimes you have to stay on the ball. If there is a potential kill/block/tip at the net, it is more important to stay on that than on where the ball may end up.

There are at least two other pairs of eyes (even if they belong to student athletes) who could tell you where the ball may land after such a play. If the play is across the court from you, R2 can also help with touches or where the ball lands. I know that these calls belong to R1, but the other officials are there for a reason. Use them to help.

You can also use the actions/reactions of the teams to help. Much like when a batter gets hit in the hand (or was it the bat?) with a pitch, reactions are part of the details you can use to help in your decision making.

My. 02. YMMV
Reply
#15

There are at least two other pairs of eyes (even if they belong to student athletes) who could tell you where the ball may land after such a play. If the play is across the court from you, R2 can also help with touches or where the ball lands. I know that these calls belong to R1, but the other officials are there for a reason. Use them to help.
[/quote]

Here, many times, at sub-varsity, we are the only official -- no R2, no line judges. In fact, most places have no line judges even at Varsity, until the state series begins.

I tak comfort in the fact that many, many "CRS reviews" in NCAA are about touches -- if they can't get it right, then I don't worry about missing a few.
Reply
#16

(10-25-2019, 03:46 PM)noumpere Wrote:  Here, many times, at sub-varsity, we are the only official -- no R2, no line judges. In fact, most places have no line judges even at Varsity, until the state series begins.

Ouch. We have 2 officials even at middle school matches. About half of the middle school matches also have line judges (read: a parent they could grab - in fact, that was how I got started with this gig). And every varsity match *must* have line judges.
Reply


Forum Jump: